Finding a spot for solo heads-down work or small group meetings can be a challenge in open-plan office spaces. Enter these three privacy panel collections that visually delineate space while also introducing a dose of colour and texture. 

1.
Textures Collection by 3form
Textures Privacy Panel Collection from 3form

Textures Capitol

The aptly named Textures collection from 3form introduces six new tactile surface options for its translucent Varia resin. Paying homage to classic architectural glass patterns, the three linear and three vintage-inspired motifs each play with light and shadow in unique ways and have varying degrees of transparency. 

Textures Privacy Panel Collection from 3form

The three linear versions include Rohe, with raised and squared horizontal lines and a notably matte texture; the wide and smooth-lined Capitol, whose glossy finish enhances the ripple-like effect; and Ozner, which sees strong fluted vertical lines bisected horizontally every six inches to create object diffusion for privacy. 

Textures Privacy Panel Collection from 3form

Textures Deco

On the vintage-inspired side are Deco, which reinterprets the bold curves and lines of its namesake design movement with a glossy finish; the matte-finished Walker, whose facetted motif takes influence from old-school cut-crystal whiskey tumblers (finished at the top and bottom by 45-centimeter-thick bands); and Bravo, with an intricate knurling texture, 30-centimetre-thick top-and-bottom banding and a glossy finish. 

Textures Privacy Panel Collection from 3form

Textures Ozner

Suitable for freestanding screens, half-desk partitions, wall dividers as well as art features, the Textures collection for the Varia panels is available in clear as well as a multitude of colourways. 

2.
Modulor Cork by Greenmood
Modulor Cork Privacy Panel Collection from Greenmood

With his Modulor Cork collection for Greenmood, Belgian designer Alain Gilles further explores biophilic materiality and adds a fresh dimension to his originally moss-covered panels. “Playing with cork in a graphic and textured manner,” Gilles developed seven patterns that range from warm, colourful and three-dimensional to neutral and subdued. The acoustic room dividers are composed of two cork panels framed by a slender metal structure with barely noticeable wheels, allowing them to be moved freely and easily. 

Modulor Cork Privacy Panel Collection from Greenmood
Modulor Cork Privacy Panel Collection from Greenmood

Available for each of the three models – Arch, Half Arch and Straight – the seven striking patterns can be rendered in solid or mixed colourways; nine nature-inspired hues (Olive, Banyan, Terra, Gentiana, Charcoal, Mahogany, Cacao, Natural and Linen) are included in the cork palette, and each can be paired with one of the nine powder-coated frame options (Corten, Gold, Matte Black, Matte White, Matte Grey, Matte Blue, Sparking Green, Sparking Red and Sparking Burgundy). 

3.
Orca Collection by Memo Furniture
Orca Privacy Panel Collection from Memo Furniture

When conceiving the Orca collection of freestanding partition screens for Seattle design brand Memo Furniture, Los Angeles-based designer Alex Brokamp reflected on a favourite childhood pastime – skipping stones across the river near his home in Loveland, Ohio. This fond memory translated into organically shaped soft volumes suspended within delicate metal frames, a pairing that references “the weightless energy a stone has when skipping across a body of water,” Brokamp notes. 

Orca Privacy Panel Collection from Memo Furniture

The Orca screens have sound-absorbing foam cores, making them both a visual boundary divider and an acoustic solution. In keeping with Memo’s commitment to minimize its carbon footprint, each screen is sewn, upholstered, finished and assembled within Seattle. Offered in vertical and horizontal orientations, the Orca collection can be upholstered in a curated portfolio of panel-suitable textiles from Maharam, Kvadrat and Camira. 

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