Discover five Mexican mountain homes that share an innate connection with their surrounding landscape.

Step inside five Mexican mountain retreats that shed light on the country’s unique approach to biophilic design. At the core of their shared design philosophies lies a strong commitment to preserving and celebrating the landscape, achieved by intertwining the natural and built form. Prioritising refined yet raw materiality, these five homes draw inspiration from their natural surroundings to blur the lines between interior and exterior.

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Casa Cedros by Aagnes | Photography by César Béjar

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Casa Cedros by Aagnes | Photography by César Béjar

Casa Cedros by Aagnes

A studio based in Guadalajara, the capital city of Jalisco, Mexico, Aagnes’ body of work revolves around the interplay of opposites – traditional and contemporary, local and global – all of which relate to a strong awareness of place. Casa Cedros encompasses this ethos by engaging with and respecting the land on which it is built, ultimately carving out a space for reflection and recess in nature.

Located in Jalisco’s southern mountains, Casa Cedros is surrounded by the iconic cedar and pine trees of the region, making it the perfect destination for a ‘cabin in the woods’. The motif of timber in Casa Cedros elevates the experience of being in the forest, Aagnes creative director Omar Godínez explains, while each individual piece – each material composition – makes some kind of tribute to the long-lasting traditions of the nearby communities; “traditions that survive thanks to the respect for craftsmanship.”

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Casa Cedros by Aagnes | Photography by César Béjar

The Hill in Front of the Glen by HW Studio Arquitectos

In the forest-covered mountains of Morelia, Mexico, HW Studio Arquitectos designed a tranquil home housed within an impressive cave-like structure.’The Hill House in Front of the Glen’ manifests as a concealed shelter crafted to both engage with and provide protection from the landscape. Concrete, steel and wood were chosen to reference the forest, fulfilling the client’s wish to “preserve the rough and primitive atmosphere of being in the mountains.”

HW Studio Arquitectos intended to create a visual continuity between the architecture and site, which they have achieved by mirroring the shape of the hills. ‘The Hill in Front of the Glen’, as it’s aptly named, assumes a low-lying, sloped shape, effectively forming a new hill among a group of already existing ones. The choice to clad the exterior in concrete was made to emphasise the act of the home ‘emerging’ from the landscape.

Casa Cosecha de Lluvia by JSa & Robert Hutchison Architecture

Located in the mountains to the west of Mexico City, Casa Cosecha de Lluvia sits intimately near the heart of where the effects of living impassively are felt. Instead of ignoring them, the bar is being raised with intention. Guiding an innate connection to the landscape, three distinct rain-harvesting pavilions – a main residence, art studio and bathhouse – come together designed by JSa and Robert Hutchison Architecture.

Sitting as part of a larger community of landscape-driven homes referred to as Reserva el Peñon, there is a compounding effect from the collective behavioural effort of using and reusing water and other energy sources. “We saw the project as a way to test out a new way of thinking, which we could then hopefully apply to future projects as well,” architect Robert Hutchison says.

House in Avándaro by Taller Héctor Barroso

Set in the heart of Valle de Bravo, Mexico, House in Avándaro, designed by Mexican architecture firm Taller Hector Barrroso features four separate volumes. Each volume frames a unique view of the Valle de Bravo forest through open-glass doors and windows. The architects playfully experiment with scale and atmosphere by featuring transitional columns that merge open indoor spaces into smaller outdoor ‘porticos’, establishing private sanctuaries for reflection and retreat.

An organic mud brick and oak wood palette mirrors the homes’ forest locale. The interplay of these raw, warm materials against the natural backdrop of the pine treescape allows the home to blend into its environment harmoniously.

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House in Avándaro by Taller Héctor Barroso | Photography by César Béjar

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House in Avándaro by Taller Héctor Barroso | Photography by César Béjar

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House in Avándaro by Taller Héctor Barroso | Photography by César Béjar

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House in Avándaro by Taller Héctor Barroso | Photography by César Béjar

Zarzales by PPAA

Also located in Valle de Bravo, Mexico, Zarzales blurs the boundaries between inside and out. The surrounding pine trees were preserved at every opportunity, while the home’s siting and flexible spaces were integral to the project’s success. PPAA have immersed two gabled volumes in the landscape, blending with the tonality of the existing tree bark. The structures comprise a social and private pavilion with glazed elements and a subdued material palette. The gable roofs are finished in a dark tile, and the external walls are rendered in an earthen hue.

There’s no hierarchy between the interior and the exterior spaces. The architects achieve this by using operable partitions to open the living area towards the outdoor terrace. The outdoor terrace, which includes a jacuzzi and swimming pool, is punctured to preserve the existing trees. Overall, there is a consciousness towards the site, which allows the homeowners to connect with the landscape.

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Zarzales by PPAA | Photography by Rafael Gamo

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Zarzales by PPAA | Photography by Rafael Gamo

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Zarzales by PPAA | Photography by Rafael Gamo

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Zarzales by PPAA | Photography by Rafael Gamo

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