On Friday, I promised to move out of summer mode and start to embrace autumn city life once again (cue, a break from all the pretty red and white Swedish country abodes – but I can’t promise they won’t pop up pretty soon again!). Today’s home tour is for everyone who is looking for a solution for a home where the sitting room also doubles up as the bedroom and a home office. In fact, one of the things I think Swedes are masters at is creating rooms within a room. 
This so called ‘one room apartment’ (which in Swedish estate agent terms means that it’s made up of one room plus and kitchen and a bathroom), measures 36 m2 / 388 f2 and occupies a section of a beautiful old apartment block dating back to 1927. The living space is relatively simply decorated, and no doubt styled for sale, even so it shows the power of calming off white walls, fluffy rugs and lots of greenery! Welcome to a flat that encompasses small space living in the heart of Gothenburg. 
In the far corner you can catch a glimpse of the wardrobe / closet. 

There’s still lots of space for books and other belongings in this room. I’d have put floor to ceiling shelving  at the end of the bed – and then it could double up as a place for novels etc as well as home office files and folders. 

An ochre wall makes all the difference the kitchen, which could have otherwise looked vary standard.
The floor has been given a lick or two of white paint which helps to brighten up the hallway / entrance. 

In Swedish apartment blocks it’s not unusual to find various communal spaces in the basement. For example, they’ll usually have a communal laundry room which are a total law unto their own and the subject of many community discussions! Take it from me, you need to book your slot well in advance if you don’t want to do your laundry at 7am on a Saturday! 
When I first moved to Sweden, we also lived in an apartment block which had access to a sauna. It was simple and understated and also subject to the same booking system. We loved it! Some apartment blocks also have access to a small apartment / bedroom for guests. And in the post WWII apartments you’ll often find a bunker too! 
Do you have something like this in your country? 
Would you like to see a few other small spaces today? Here are some truly inspiring homes: 
Also: 
Have a great start to the week friends! 
Niki
Photography courtesy of Kvarteret

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On Friday, I promised to move out of summer mode and start to embrace autumn city life once again (cue, a break from all the pretty red and white Swedish country abodes – but I can’t promise they won’t pop up pretty soon again!). Today’s home tour is for everyone who is looking for a solution for a home where the sitting room also doubles up as the bedroom and a home office. In fact, one of the things I think Swedes are masters at is creating rooms within a room. 
This so called ‘one room apartment’ (which in Swedish estate agent terms means that it’s made up of one room plus and kitchen and a bathroom), measures 36 m2 / 388 f2 and occupies a section of a beautiful old apartment block dating back to 1927. The living space is relatively simply decorated, and no doubt styled for sale, even so it shows the power of calming off white walls, fluffy rugs and lots of greenery! Welcome to a flat that encompasses small space living in the heart of Gothenburg. 
In the far corner you can catch a glimpse of the wardrobe / closet. 

There’s still lots of space for books and other belongings in this room. I’d have put floor to ceiling shelving  at the end of the bed – and then it could double up as a place for novels etc as well as home office files and folders. 

An ochre wall makes all the difference the kitchen, which could have otherwise looked vary standard.
The floor has been given a lick or two of white paint which helps to brighten up the hallway / entrance. 

In Swedish apartment blocks it’s not unusual to find various communal spaces in the basement. For example, they’ll usually have a communal laundry room which are a total law unto their own and the subject of many community discussions! Take it from me, you need to book your slot well in advance if you don’t want to do your laundry at 7am on a Saturday! 
When I first moved to Sweden, we also lived in an apartment block which had access to a sauna. It was simple and understated and also subject to the same booking system. We loved it! Some apartment blocks also have access to a small apartment / bedroom for guests. And in the post WWII apartments you’ll often find a bunker too! 
Do you have something like this in your country? 
Would you like to see a few other small spaces today? Here are some truly inspiring homes: 
Also: 
Have a great start to the week friends! 
Niki
Photography courtesy of Kvarteret