Nicholas Blechman, the creative director of The New Yorker, and Luise Stauss, a photo editor and art director, open their doors.

“We’re not going anywhere,” declares Luise Stauss, a freelance art director, photo editor, and soon-to-be mother of two as she rubs her six-month baby bump. Despite the tight proportions of her two-bedroom Brooklyn apartment, she has no intention of trading up for anything bigger.

Luise Stauss, a former photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, sits in the living room of the downtown Brooklyn apartment she shares with her husband, Nicholas Blechman, the creative director of The New Yorker. The roughly 1,000-square-foot space feels larger than it is, thanks to high ceilings and bay windows. Twin 1962 Bastiano sofas by Tobia Scarpa are joined by a Cité chair by Jean Prouvé and a wood chair acquired from the New York Historical Society. The floor lamp is by David Weeks Studio.

Luise Stauss, a former photo editor at The New York Times Magazine,  sits in the living room of the downtown Brooklyn apartment she shares with her husband, Nicholas Blechman, the creative director of The New Yorker. The roughly 1,000-square-foot space feels larger than it is, thanks to high ceilings and bay windows. Twin 1962 Bastiano sofas by Tobia Scarpa are joined by a Cité chair by Jean Prouvé and a wood chair acquired from the New York Historical Society. The floor lamp is by David Weeks Studio.

Photo by Stephen Kent Johnson

Fourteen years ago, Luise and her husband, Nicholas Blechman, now the creative director of The New Yorker, pulled up stakes in Williamsburg, when it was still kind of edgy, and moved a few miles south to comparatively comatose Brooklyn Heights. They had fallen for a 1948 building designed by architect A. Rollin Caughey.

A red Crosley turntable sits on top of a custom shelving unit in the living room. The use of primary colors, also seen in the yellow Stool 60 by Alvar Aalto, is a nod to the Bauhaus, says Luise.

A red Crosley turntable sits on top of a custom shelving unit in the living room. The use of primary colors, also seen in the yellow Stool 60 by Alvar Aalto, is a nod to the Bauhaus, says Luise.

Photo by Stephen Kent Johnson

The matchmaker was their friend Christoph Niemann, an illustrator best known for his New Yorker covers and children’s books. Niemann was born in Germany (as was Luise) and lived with his family on the seventh floor of the Breukelen, a 12-story cream-colored building on Montague Street.

The coffee table is a Drum pouf with wood tray top, both by Softline for Design Within Reach; the yellow throw is by Raf Simons for Kvadrat. On the wall is a silkscreened L’Homme Wiggly poster by Greg Clarke.

The coffee table is a Drum pouf with wood tray top, both by Softline for Design Within Reach and the yellow throw is by Raf Simons for Kvadrat. On the wall is a silkscreened L’Homme Wiggly poster by Greg Clarke.

Photo by Stephen Kent Johnson

See the full story on Dwell.com: Two Magazine Creatives Fit Graphic Art and Vintage Furniture In a Brooklyn Apartment

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