Three Ways with Concrete

Always bookmarking inspiring projects, this week I noticed a theme of concrete emerging. I love seeing this raw and textural material used in new and interesting ways, and these three projects provide plenty of eye-candy. 

— Purgatory by Photonic —

Collaborating with clients across the globe, from Monaco to Melbourne, and New York to Moscow, Brisbane-based creative studio, Photonic, specialises in marketing CG images, architectural concept and spatial design. This bathroom entitled ‘Purgatory – A quiet place of particular charm‘ features a minimalist design and expansive use of concrete. The stairway leading down to the arched entrance gives the space a a spa-like feel, and I love how the sheer curtains add a softness to the space.

Images via Photonic


— Atilleriet Presents Past Present Future —

Always inspiring, Swedish store Atilleriet has undergone a complete renovation, with the addition of a brand new floor. Celebrating the reopening with Past Present Future, the exhibition is a tribute to all the brands they have collaborated with over the years. The new space features concrete floors, exposed brick and textural walls, providing a raw and interesting backdrop for the beautiful curation of furniture, lighting, art sculptural ceramics. These include some of my favourite chairs, including the Mattiazzi Clerici Lounge Chair, the Crown armchair by Mass Productions and the Little Petra sheepskin armchair by &Tradition. Artilleriet always showcase the best collection of vases, with some of picks below being the new Muses collection and Shell Pot by ferm LIVING, the Shell Marula ceramic vase with handles and Sphere Square by 101 Copenhagen.  

 Images via Artilleriet


— Perfect Storm by Killing Matt Woods —

Inspired by Brutalist architecture and dubbed the ‘concrete bunker’ due to its heavy use of rendered finishes and textural interiors, Perfect Storm is an inner city warehouse conversion in Camperdown, Sydney. Created by Killing Matt Woods, the open plan apartment is a lesson in restraint designed to be free of clutter and visual noise. Featuring pure and monolithic forms, I love how the use of curves introduce a softness and contrast to the overall design. This element can be seen in the kitchen island, furniture, wood-panelled bedroom wall, arched mirror and bathroom door.

Styling by Madeline Mcfarlane / Photography by Katherine Lau

Images via Killing Matt Woods

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