In the historic hamlet of Amagansett in Suffolk County, New York, is where you’ll find the lovely “Lanes,” a set of pedestrian-friendly streets all within walking distance to the ocean.

An expansive lap pool.

Although these lanes are lined with homes of various styles and forms, what makes this area unique is how the longitudinal aspect of the houses frequently extend from side to side within a given parcel, giving them a somewhat cramped appearance when seen from the street. 

While the “Lanes” are home to multiple stunning properties, one in particular we can’t get enough of is the three-level, 7,300-square-foot residence that New York-based firm MB Architecture recently worked on.

A house in Suffolk County with concrete foundational walls, charred siding siding and VMZinc zinc roof.

This house on the “Lanes” was designed with concrete foundational walls, charred siding, and VMZinc zinc roof.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

The team decided to free up space on the sides of the parcel by positioning the narrower side of the house to face the street so that the south-facing length of the home could enjoy direct sunlight. This also created more distance between the house and neighboring properties.

The parent's bedroom is located at one end of the top floor.

The parent’s bedroom is located at one end of the top floor.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

The owners originally wanted a maintenance-free home, with interiors and exteriors that would be durable. Therefore, MB Architecture’s lead architects Maziar Behrooz and Bruce Engel chose materials that were hardy, free from delicate detailing, and ones that wouldn’t require any refinishing over time.

Tagore light in the foyer by Artemide.

Tagore light in the foyer by Artemide.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

They used raw concrete for the foundational walls, zinc for the roof, and charred cypress for the sidings and interiors. To ensure proper sealing, the windows and doors were pushed tight up to the forward plane of the clapboards.

Hallway on the second level of the house.

Above is the hallway on the second level of the house.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

Working with landscape designer Shep Butler, Behrooz and Engel created a meadow-like garden around the front yard, using a green buffer to provide the owners with plenty of privacy.

An expansive lap pool.

A view of the expansive lap pool leading up to the house.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

The length of the exterior walls are clad in charred cypress, and the rich textural contrast between concrete and wood on the façade is repeated within the house. 

The garage behind the concrete wall.

Here you can see the garage behind the concrete wall.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

The communal zones, as well as a guest bedroom, are located on the ground level. In the living room, a raw steel box inserted into one of the concrete walls serves as a storage system for the owners’ collection of vintage vinyl records. 

A raw steel box inserted into one of the concrete walls serves as a storage system for the owners’ collection of rare vintage vinyl records.

The owners opted to use a raw steel box as a storage system for their collection of vintage vinyl records.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

A green Finnjuhl sofa and table at fireplace, and pendants from Foscarini.

Above is a green Finnjuhl sofa and table at the fireplace, as well as pendants from Foscarini.



Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

A guest bedroom on the ground floor.

A guest bedroom is also located on the ground floor.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

“A sunken courtyard on the south side of the house, and a generous light-well on the north break the flatness of the site, and allow light to be filtered into the lower level, transforming the basement into a well-lit family room with a private outdoor space,” says Behrooz. 

The rich textural contrast between concrete and wood on the façade, is repeated with the interiors.

As you can see above, a rich textural contrast between concrete and wood on the façade is repeated throughout the interior of the house.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

A suspension lamp by Fontana Arte.

The owners also chose a suspension lamp by Fontana Arte to hang over the dining table.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

A bright and elegant kitchen.

Thanks to the innovative design, the residents can now enjoy a bright and elegant kitchen.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

A porch and roof “cut-out” separates the parent’s bedroom on one end from the two children’s bedrooms on the opposite ends.

On the second level, a porch “cut-out” separates the master bedroom from the two children’s bedrooms on the opposite end.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

“The porch is entered through a south-facing sliding glass door that, together with the north-facing ribbon window, allow natural light to filter into the house and reflect down into the heart of the house via narrow slits and openings along the staircase and its concrete stair-wall,” says Engel.

An entertainment lounge.

Here is a view of the entertainment lounge.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

A peek at the home from a distance.

Courtesy of Matthew Carbone

Cross section

Above is the plan for the cross section.

Courtesy of MB Architecture

Longitudinal cross section

A look at the longitudinal cross section is also available.

Courtesy of MB Architecture

Floor plan

Here is the entire floor plan.

Courtesy of MB Architecture

Project Credits: 

– Architecture: Marziar Behrooz and Bruce Engel of MB Architecture 

– Builder: Richard Swanson Contracting 

– Structural engineering: Greg Llewellyn 

– Landscape design: Shep Butler

– Landscape installation: Landscape Details 

– Lighting design: Caitlin Faron of Shine 

– Interior design Afsheen Kothari Design 

– Photography: Matthew Carbone

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