Wrapped around a mature oak tree, a light-filled shipping container home embraces the outdoors in more ways than one.

The home is located on a wedge-shaped wooded lot with only one neighbor to the north. Mahogany decking connects the front door to the parking pad.

In the East Hampton village of Amagansett, Manhattan-based MB Architecture has completed their largest—and most complex—prefab project to date: a 1,800-square-foot shipping container home that emphasizes indoor/outdoor living.

The container house is designed to wrap around an existing oak tree.

The container house is designed to wrap around an existing oak tree.

Matthew Carbone

“[It’s the] culmination of 10 years of research prototyping,” says Maziar Behrooz, founder of MB Architecture. His award-winning cargotecture work drew the attention of the clients, a couple with three young children, who had been looking for an alternative to the ubiquitous wood-shingled homes in the Amagansett area.

“The fact that our prefab projects are less expensive and take less time to build was an additional incentive,” adds Behrooz.



The home is located on a wedge-shaped wooded lot with only one neighbor to the north. Mahogany decking connects the front door to the parking pad.

The home is located on a wedge-shaped wooded lot with only one neighbor to the north. Mahogany decking connects the front door to the parking pad.

Matthew Carbone

The home, dubbed the Amagansett Modular House, is modeled after MB Architecture’s insta_house—a scalable, prefab structure made of four 40-foot-long shipping containers that can be stacked together and installed in just one day.

To meet the clients’ requirements for a four-bedroom, three-bath retreat, the architects expanded upon the insta_house blueprint with an additional 40-foot container on the north side—connected to the main double-height volume via a glassed-in walkway—as well as a 10-foot container that hangs off the second floor.

A glassed-in walkway connects the open-plan living areas to a separate bedroom wing.

A glassed-in walkway connects the open-plan living areas to a separate bedroom wing.

Matthew Carbone

See the full story on Dwell.com: This Airy Hamptons Home Is Made From Six Shipping Containers

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