The home’s industrial facade is easily overlooked—but step through the door and you’ll find a sublimely sunlit, matte-black interior.

With no traditional windows, the main level is illuminated by three expansive light wells that define a series of glass-encased outdoor areas.

British-Ghanaian architect Sir David Adjaye has earned numerous accolades throughout his career—including a 2017 appointment as Knight Bachelor by Queen Elizabeth II and, more recently, the 2021 RIBA Royal Gold Medal. His international portfolio includes the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC—and he’s also noted for his bold residential commissions closer to home in England.

One such property, known as the Lost House, occupies the former delivery bay of an industrial building in London—and it just hit the market for only the second time since its completion in 2004.

The Lost House by Sir David Adjaye occupies what was once an industrial building’s drive-through delivery bay.

The Lost House by Sir David Adjaye occupies what was once an industrial building’s drive-through delivery bay.

Photo courtesy of The Modern House

Now enclosed at both ends, the unassuming facade conceals interior features such as a sunlit courtyard and a swimming pool.

Now enclosed at both ends, the unassuming facade conceals interior features such as a sunlit courtyard and a swimming pool.

Photo courtesy of The Modern House

With no traditional windows, the main level is illuminated by three expansive light wells that define a series of glass-encased outdoor areas.

With no traditional windows, the main level is illuminated by three expansive light wells that define a series of glass-encased outdoor areas.

Photo courtesy of The Modern House

See the full story on Dwell.com: The Lost House by Legendary Architect David Adjaye Asks $8.4M
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