Japanese and Scandinavian influences come together to produce a look that’s serene, organic, and refined.

Architect Johan Sundberg looked to Japanese architects like Kengo Kuma for inspiration for the design of a holiday home in southern Sweden.

A hybrid aesthetic combining the comfort and functionality of Scandinavian design with the simple elegance of Japanese style, the “Japandi” look is on the rise, regardless of one’s thoughts on the portmanteau.

Inspired by a homesteading commune he documented in Western North Carolina, photographer Mike Belleme built the Nook, a minimalist retreat in the woods that draws from both Japanese and Scandinavian design. He foraged much of the wood for the 400-square-foot cabin. "Every kind of wood has a certain mood and personality," he says. The exterior features an entranceway of oak blackened in the traditional Japanese method known as shou sugi ban.

Inspired by a homesteading commune he documented in Western North Carolina, photographer Mike Belleme built the Nook, a minimalist retreat in the woods that draws from both Japanese and Scandinavian design. He foraged much of the wood for the 400-square-foot cabin. “Every kind of wood has a certain mood and personality,” he says. The exterior features an entranceway of oak blackened in the traditional Japanese method known as shou sugi ban.

Mike Belleme

It’s a natural marriage between two cultures that privilege minimalism and tranquility, and their differences also complement each other. The Scandinavian concept of hygge veers rustic, utilizing light wood, crisp neutrals, and simple layouts that can bring earthiness to a space; Japanese design contributes an emphasis on warm, rich colors and an indoor/outdoor experience that allows a home feel cozy, yet tied to the environment.

A few steps removed from the living space is the kitchen that features vertical grain fir cabinets complemented by Ann Sacks backsplash tile and white quartz countertops.

In California’s idyllic Sea Ranch community, a vacation home privileges views of the Pacific Ocean and fog-shrouded trees. The bright and airy interiors, following a crisp, Scandinavian aesthetic, are pared back to retain focus on the spectacular surroundings.

Joe Fletcher

Architect Charlie Lazor designed this peaceful, lakeside prefab in Ontario, Canada, with a Japanese-style bathroom clad in richly stained teak with a matching tub and sink by Bath in Wood.

See the full story on Dwell.com: How Japandi Design Can Bring Comfort and Simplicity to Your Home
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