Rumors have swirled for decades that a midcentury gem in Portland, Oregon, is an unrecognized work by America’s most famous architect.

For more than 70 years, claims have persisted, without much evidence, that a home in Portland, Oregon, is a lost work by Frank Lloyd Wright. Regardless of authorship, the structure—a flat-roofed, cedar and glass ranch—endures as a sterling example of postwar American  architecture. Its recessed entryway features panes of translucent glass.

When Kelsey and Scott Bouska bought a postwar home in the West Hills area of Portland, Oregon, in 2016, they had no idea anyone had ever suggested that its architect was Frank Lloyd Wright. “We didn’t hear a word about that until after the transaction was done,” Scott says.

For more than 70 years, claims have persisted, without much evidence, that a home in Portland, Oregon, is a lost work by Frank Lloyd Wright. Regardless of authorship, the structure—a flat-roofed, cedar and glass ranch—endures as a sterling example of postwar American  architecture. Its recessed entryway features panes of translucent glass.

For more than 70 years, claims have persisted, without much evidence, that a home in Portland, Oregon, is a lost work by Frank Lloyd Wright. Regardless of authorship, the structure—a flat-roofed, cedar and glass ranch—endures as a sterling example of postwar American
architecture. Its recessed entryway features panes of translucent glass. 

Photo by Brian Flaherty

The Bouskas, who both work at Nike’s world headquarters in nearby Beaverton, instead were attracted to the natural setting. “It’s so serene,” Kelsey says. “You feel like you’re in the wilderness.” The house, shaped like a boomerang, is designed to maximize that feeling, with floor-to-ceiling glass in the living room and a master bedroom framed by windows on three sides. “It’s like you’re living in a snow globe,” she adds. Mahogany cabinetry and marble countertops, part of a recent remodel by the previous owner, also give the home an understated elegance.

Windows offer wraparound views in the master bedroom. The nightstands and bed are from the Matera line by Sean Yoo for Design Within Reach; the Stem lamps are from Rejuvenation. The last owner painted the walls Gentleman’s Gray by Benjamin Moore.

Windows offer wraparound views in the master bedroom. The nightstands and bed are from the Matera line by Sean Yoo for Design Within Reach; the Stem lamps are from Rejuvenation. The last owner painted the walls Gentleman’s Gray by Benjamin Moore.

Photo by Brian Flaherty

The Frank Lloyd Wright claim, investigated by local historian Tanya Lyn March, seems to be an urban legend. Actor Margaretta Ramsey and her naval officer husband, Walter, had the house built in 1947 after he was transferred from New York City, where she had recently starred in a Broadway production of Shakespeare’s As You Like It. Later, she would go on to act in film and television.

A Lollygagger lounge chair by Loll Designs sits on the back deck.

A Lollygagger lounge chair by Loll Designs sits on the back deck.

Photo by Brian Flaherty

See the full story on Dwell.com: Could This Home in Oregon Really Be a Long Lost Frank Lloyd Wright?

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