Osmose Design enlivens a 1930s residence with eccentric, handcrafted details.

Hess combined a John Boos butcher-block table with a piece carved by local wood sculptor Vince Skelly to create a sculptural kitchen island.

In a home full of delightful surprises, it’s only fitting that its origin story involves a dash of serendipity: When designer Andee Hess was contacted by musician Charlie and her husband, Todd, to remodel the kitchen in their 1930s Tudor home in the West Hills of Portland, Oregon, they discovered they were already acquainted—not only did they share mutual friends, but they were also fans of each other’s work.

Before: Living Room Fireplace 

Before: The fireplace had a lackluster treatment and scarce mantel space.

Before: The fireplace had a lackluster treatment and scarce mantel space. 

Courtesy of Osmose Design

After: Living Room Fireplace

A new, sweeping plaster form flows around the fireplace, elongating the mantel and creating display shelves in a previously unused alcove. The convex tile treatment composed of Clé tile provides a rich contrast with the plaster, and the new hearth is marble.

A new, sweeping plaster form flows around the fireplace, elongating the mantel and creating display shelves in a previously unused alcove. The convex tile treatment composed of Clé tile provides a rich contrast with the plaster, and the new hearth is marble.

Dina Avila

This spirit of creative kinship extended to the design process with the founder of Osmose Design drawing from myriad influences such as boat casework, Greek caves, and the American studio craft movement for a remodel that would expand beyond the kitchen. Overhauling previous work done to the Tudor, the project would reimagine the living room fireplace, an underused niche, and the main floor bathroom. Hess used sweeping plaster forms, handcrafted wood elements, and statement tile for a look that’s organic, bohemian, and entirely unexpected.

Before: Niche

Before: Prior to the remodel, the space in the nook was underutilized despite having great windows overlooking the city.

Before: Prior to the remodel, the space in the nook was underutilized despite having great windows overlooking the city.

Courtesy of Osmose Design

See the full story on Dwell.com: Before & After: In This Portland Tudor, an Irresistibly Quirky Kitchen Steals the Show
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