Once overlooked and overgrown, this 1962 home now features sunlit rooms and thoughtful outdoor spaces.

The design team created four different outdoor spaces—a planted terrace off the living room, a screened-in porch, a rooftop deck above the porch, and a yard—to achieve the indoor/outdoor lifestyle the homeowners craved.

Scott Satin and Marilyn Kitzes were frustrated: While they dreamed of renovating a midcentury-modern house, their beloved neighborhood in Washington, DC—which they were loath to abandon—was dominated by colonial and Arts-and-Crafts-style homes.

Talking about the quandary with a friend one day, Marilyn learned about a potential hidden gem. “She asked me if I had seen the house across the alley,” Marilyn, a freelance copywriter, recalls. “I had no idea what she was talking about.”

So, they took a walk to view the property. “She showed me this incredibly overgrown house that was vacant,” she says. “And I just had this real feeling of ‘Oh my gosh, I can’t believe this house is standing here.’” 

Before: Facade

Before: The home had a pink brick exterior, with minimal windows on the facade.

Before: The home had a pink brick exterior, with minimal windows on the facade.

Scott Satin

The house was “a little strange looking” and not on the market, so Marilyn knocked on a few neighbors’ doors to find out more about the property. It was part of an estate, and the owner had died four years prior.

“It was a simple structure,” says Scott, a trained but non-practicing architect (he now works as the president of a digital health research company). “It had a single gable roof and one load-bearing wall down the middle of the house. It was essentially a square box. It was obvious just by looking at it that we could blow it wide open and create the kinds of spaces we were hoping for.”

After: Facade

The design team painted the exterior a dark, charcoal gray and sliced a two-story volume through the facade, removing part of the second floor to create the double-height space.

The design team painted the exterior a dark, charcoal gray and sliced a two-story volume through the facade, removing part of the second floor to create the double-height space.

Jennifer Hughes 

They bought the home from the estate’s executor in 2015, and their first call was to architect David Thompson of the Los Angeles–based studio Assembledge+. Scott had gone to architecture school with him, and the two had previously worked together when Scott was practicing.

Before: Staircase

Before: The original staircase was somewhat enclosed.

Before: The original staircase was somewhat enclosed.

Scott Satin

See the full story on Dwell.com: Before & After: An Enlivened DC Residence Now Channels California Cool
Related stories:

©











Loading...