A dated midcentury ranch in Santa Barbara is transformed into a bright, airy abode—perfectly suited for contemporary living.

Sited just a half-block from the Pacific Ocean and neighboring a 70-acre ocean-side preserve, the location of the 1952 ranch-style dwelling could not have been better. Yet, homeowner Heather Greene of Sprout Concepts envisioned a more modern look for the modestly sized 1,100-square-foot residence in Santa Barbara, California. 

To take charge of the renovation, Greene called upon local firm Anacapa, where she worked in collaboration with architect Dan Weber. Given the extensive updates that needed to be completed on the three-bedroom, two-bath property, the redesign soon turned into a three-year project. 

Before: The Exterior

A look at the 1952 ranch before the renovation.

A look at the 1952 ranch before the renovation. 

Heather Greene

At the start of the renovation, the team planned to incorporate the home’s basic footprint into the redesign and retain the original foundation. Yet, once the demolition took place, the architects determined the foundation was not safe to build on and needed to be completely replaced. 

Here is the carport before the renovation.

Here is the carport before the renovation. 



Heather Greene

By relocating the garage to the front, the architects reconfigured the home’s floor plan to transform the carport structure into a new master suite, which increased the home’s square footage by approximately 1,000 square feet. Now, this area, along with two guest bedrooms, are located in the “private” wing of the home. The new design maximizes natural light through extensive glazing via skylights and oversized sliding glass doors. 

After: The Exterior

The astonishing transformation post renovation. The exterior palette consists of white stucco and Ipe wood, and the landscaping in the front yard is comprised of drought-tolerant plants, with a focus on succulents.

The astonishing transformation post renovation. The exterior palette consists of white stucco and Ipe wood, and the landscaping in the front yard is comprised of drought-tolerant plants, with a focus on succulents. 

Erin Feinblatt

See the full story on Dwell.com: Before & After: A Dark Midcentury Turns Into a Luminous Gem

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