Built in the 1960s and now asking $4.2M, the Frank Lloyd Wright–inspired Mirrabooka House sits on five acres of magnificent gardens.

A large, cantilevered balcony wraps around the living area and provides ample outdoor space for entertaining, as well as sunset views over the five-acre plot and an adjacent town park.

Sydney-born architect and landscape designer Bruce Rickard was once described as “the Frank Lloyd Wright of Australian architecture.” While certainly inspired by Wright—whom he first studied at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1950s—Rickard also used his formal training of both indoor and outdoor plans to harmoniously adapt Wrightsonian ideas to Australia’s native landscape and climate. An exceptional example of these dual talents is the Mirrabooka House, originally built in the early 1960s and now on the market for the first time since its construction.

The Mirrabooka House by Bruce Rickard sits on a lush, five-acre plot in the community of Castle Hill, about 18 miles northwest of Sydney. The structure's design—which spreads broadly across the site—displays a horizontality reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright’s work.

The Mirrabooka House by Bruce Rickard sits on a lush, five-acre plot in the community of Castle Hill, about 18 miles northwest of Sydney. The structure’s design—which spreads broadly across the site—is reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie-style homes. 

Photo by Skyline Creative for Sydney Sotheby’s International Realty

Inside, Wright's influence continues with details such as the central hearth and stone fireplace,

Inside, Wright’s influence continues with details such as the prominent hearth and fireplace, as well as the use of organic materials and built-ins throughout. The home is also heavily integrated with the site, and benefits from ample natural light and a harmonious indoor/outdoor flow.

Photo by Skyline Creative for Sydney Sotheby’s International Realty

The homeowner’s extensive knowledge of native and exotic plants influenced the structure’s integration with the site and the impressive gardens—both of which were recently designated a State Heritage Site by New South Wales. The close interconnection of the home with the land is demonstrated by the picturesque entry sequence, which features stepping stones over a koi pond that lead to the front door. 

A skylight above the fireplace casts sunlight onto the stacked stone fireplace. A raised dining area is located to the right, while a playroom and the kitchen can be accessed from the left.

A skylight above the fireplace casts sunlight onto the stacked stone fireplace. A raised dining area is located to the right, while a playroom and the kitchen are both accessible on the left.

Photo by Skyline Creative for Sydney Sotheby’s International Realty

See the full story on Dwell.com: An Australian Architect’s Dazzling Interpretation of Prairie Style Lists for the First Time

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