Wrapped in cedar shakes, a small cottage uses angled walls to sidestep code restraints and gain greater living space.

The Hive was completed in May 2015 for a total construction cost of $160,000.

Despite its seemingly random appearance and slanted walls, the decisions behind the playful shape of this compact East Austin cottage are rooted in practical problem solving—just ask Nicole Blair, architect and founder of the local practice Studio 512.

The one-bedroom abode features a wood-and-steel frame clad in oversized cedar shakes repurposed from the roof of another home.

The one-bedroom abode features a wood-and-steel frame clad in oversized cedar shakes repurposed from the roof of another home.

Whit Preston Photographer

“The Hive’s 320-square-foot footprint is the maximum allowed for a guest house by the city of Austin on this residential lot,” Nicole explains. “To gain enough volume to fit a one-bedroom dwelling, walls tilt from the slab—hugging building setback planes and an angled utility easement at the back of the property—to add volume where needed, evoking the shape of a beehive.”

Built for television and documentary film producer Kerthy Fix, The Hive is located behind the client’s main residence in East Austin.

Built for television and documentary film producer Kerthy Fix, The Hive is located behind the client’s main residence in East Austin.

Whit Preston Photographer

The Hive was completed in May 2015 for a total construction cost of $160,000.

The Hive was completed in May 2015 for a total construction cost of $160,000.

Casey Dunn

See the full story on Dwell.com: A Whimsical Guest House Leans Out to Maximize Space

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