A 164-square-foot retreat in Litibú features a courtyard with an oculus that frames the sky.

The compact retreat in Nayarit, Mexico, that Palma designed for an American couple comprises two stucco-clad volumes connected by a patio. The oculus above the open space frames the sky.

About an hour north of Puerto Vallarta on Mexico’s Pacific Coast is the small town of Litibú and its wealth of idyllic beaches. “There are around 100 people registered as living in Litibú, so it’s a quiet and simple town,” says architect Diego Escamilla of architecture studio Palma. “We believe that with a landscape like this, architecture should take a step back, so you can feel and enjoy the power of the place.”

The 164-square-foot retreat that Palma designed for an American couple does just that: A minimalist outpost surrounded by waving palm trees, it allows the tropical landscape to take the lead.

The compact retreat in Nayarit, Mexico, that Palma designed for an American couple comprises two stucco-clad volumes connected by a patio. The oculus above the open space frames the sky.

The compact retreat in Nayarit, Mexico, that Palma designed for an American couple comprises two stucco-clad volumes connected by a patio. The oculus above the open space frames the sky.

Luis Young

In their effort to put nature first, the architects arranged two simple volumes on either side of a connective courtyard that features an oculus carved out of the center of the roof. The residents pass through the courtyard when they move from the kitchen and living area to the bedroom and bathroom on the other side.  

“The patio serves as a transition between public and private space,” Escamilla says. “It forces you be outside, to look at the sky through the oculus.”

The courtyard at the center of the home is a meditative space that reconnects the residents with the landscape and sky.

The courtyard at the center of the home is a meditative space that reconnects the residents with the landscape and sky.

Luis Young

Taken as a whole, the rectangular tiny house presents a void at the center—a void that welcomes a connection to shifting breezes, sunlight, and surrounding greenery. The rooms that flank the courtyard meld with the landscape, too, with wood-and-glass doors that fold completely open. 

“Every room opens to the exterior and lets the outdoors in,” says Escamilla. “The design looks to traditional tropical architecture in Mexico.”

In the kitchen, concrete floors and counters are offset by wood cabinetry and doors that add warmth to the space.

In the kitchen, concrete floors and counters are offset by wood cabinetry and doors that add warmth to the space.

Luis Young

See the full story on Dwell.com: A Tiny, Thatched-Roof Hideaway in Mexico Pays Homage to the Tropical Landscape
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