Previously kept a secret at the request of the original homeowners, the Fullham Residence in Newton, Pennsylvania, finally gets completed according to the iconic architect’s original plans.

The floors upstairs, originally a battleship gray linoleum, were replaced with oak flooring.

At the request of the original clients, Judge John and Alice Fullam, who resided in the home from 1958 to 2006, architect Paul Rudolph never publicized this design during his lifetime. In fact, it wasn’t until 2006 that awareness of the great design dawned, as the new owners became concerned over the fate of the residence. From 2007 to 2014, work was done to bring the residence up to code. The biggest turning point occurred in 2014, when Eric Wolff purchased the home and found out that the original 1957 drawings by Rudolph himself still existed. With the help of architect John Wolstenholme, Wolff researched the original drawings, and upon discovering Rudolph’s intent to add a third bay, decided to construct the approximately 1,000-square-foot addition to complete Rudolph’s original design composition. 

The roof, which appears to float above the heavy stone walls, tilts slightly upward along the southwestern facade, creating the ideal design for passive solar heating.

The roof, which appears to float above the heavy stone walls, tilts slightly upward along the southwestern facade, creating the ideal design for passive solar heating.

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The residence represents a turning point for Rudolph: a turn from his earlier planar designs to the geometric, sculptural designs which propelled him to stardom as an architect. The Fullam Residence is created around the idea of massings, geometric forms extending beyond the building envelope. A strong juxtaposition of heavy and light appears between the thick, Pennsylvania-fieldstone walls, and the roof which appears to float above. Negative spaces between the stone massings are infilled with glass, creating light-filled interiors. The unusual roof configuration allows the winter sun to fall deep into the space, passively heating the stones, while providing shade from the warm summer sun. 

A balance of solid and void, heavy and transparent, and elegant and masculine define the exterior motif of the residence.  Masonry walls define the shape, while class infills the negative space between.

A balance of solidity and void, weight and transparency, and elegance and masculinity define the residence’s exterior. Masonry walls define the shape, while glass infills the negative space between.

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Full height glazing allows daylight to fall deep into the space, extending into the mezzanine living spaces.  A stone fireplace anchors the living space while extending upward.

Full-height glazing allows daylight to fall deep into the home, extending into the mezzanine. A stone fireplace anchors the living space while extending upward.

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See the full story on Dwell.com: A Paul Rudolph-Designed Midcentury Is Rescued From Obscurity and Finally Completed

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