In Sagaponack, a sustainable-building magnate’s live/work Climate Barn provides a model for green construction.

Jeff Tannenbaum may very well be the sustainability movement’s adopter-in-chief. The private investment fund that Tannenbaum founded in 1994 purchased carbon offsets and embraced LEED-accredited workspace design almost immediately after both concepts were developed in the late ’90s. 

By 2017, he had created the largest independent utility-scale solar business in the United States. He had also founded a nonprofit that promotes innovative financing for energy-efficient construction and retrofits. “If you show Americans that you can solve sustainability problems profitably, you can solve them much faster,” Jeff says.

Created as a retreat for scientists and researchers, the Climate Barn in eastern Long Island is the brain-child of owners Jeff Tannenbaum and Nisa Geller. Working with architect Shauna McManus, they’ve created a net-zero-energy structure that showcases affordable, sustainable design.

Created as a retreat for scientists and researchers, the Climate Barn in eastern Long Island is the brain-child of owners Jeff Tannenbaum and Nisa Geller. Working with architect Shauna McManus, they’ve created a net-zero-energy structure that showcases affordable, sustainable design.

Photo by Brian W. Ferry

Jeff and his wife, Nisa Geller, executive director of a social-justice NGO, share their good fortune with the environmentalist community as well. For the past 15 years, the couple have invited climate research leaders (among them legendary scientist and activist James Hansen, one of the first to raise awareness about global warming) to seasonal residencies at their vacation home in Sagaponack, on Long Island’s East End. 

“We always had it in the back of our minds to do something like this,” says Jeff. “At some point we wanted to build a house that totally represented our values.” The solar panels on the home are by SunPower.

Photo by Brian W. Ferry

Triple-glazed windows and doors from Zola mitigate thermal gain.

Triple-glazed windows and doors from Zola mitigate thermal gain. 

Photo by Brian W. Ferry

See the full story on Dwell.com: A Net-Zero-Energy Barn on Long Island Is a Hub for Climate Researchers
Related stories:

©











Loading...