Sarasota School specialists Seibert Architects transform a run-down, historic structure into a light-filled family home that echoes the past.

Sarasota School specialists Seibert Architects transform a run-down, historic structure into a light-filled family home that echoes the past.

It was a 2004 article in the New York Times that first introduced Roberto and Clare Arguedas to Martie Lieberman, a Florida real estate agent who focuses on selling architecturally significant houses. Planning a move to Sarasota, Florida, at the time, they read of Lieberman’s efforts to preserve the city’s modernist dwellings built during the Sarasota School of Architecture movement in the ’50s and ’60s by the likes of Ralph Twitchell, Paul Rudolph, and Philip Hiss.

The wall-wrapped courtyard provides private outdoor space and blocks noise from the facing street.

The wall-wrapped courtyard provides private outdoor space and blocks noise from the facing street. 

Ryan Gamma Photography

Enthralled, the couple reached out to Lieberman, who educated them on this period of architectural history and its impact on the Lido Shores neighborhood in particular. After an extensive tour, she even found the couple a 3,510-square-foot home designed by Twitchell’s office—albeit one that suffered years of neglect. That’s when Lieberman suggested that the Sarasota School–savvy local practice Seibert Architects step in.

A painting by Taiwanese artist James Jean is a focal point in the main living area, where low ceilings, common to architecture of the era, led interior designer Jennifer Masters to select furniture that sits at a lower height

A painting by Taiwanese artist James Jean is a focal point in the main living area, where low ceilings, common to architecture of the era, led interior designer Jennifer Masters to select furniture that sits at a lower height “without sacrificing comfort.” Bonus: unimpeded views of the pool. 

Ryan Gamma Photography

This navy-blue velvet Ico Parisi–inspired Comma Sofa

This navy-blue velvet Ico Parisi–inspired Comma Sofa “evokes a water element, soft movement, and speaks to the history of the home,” says Masters.

Ryan Gamma Photography

See the full story on Dwell.com: A Dramatic Sawtooth Roof Infuses This Midcentury Florida Revamp With Vintage Vibes
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