Sited in the upper garden of a 17th-century building, a contemporary abode blends beautifully with its historical setting.

The award-winning firm OB Architecture has recently revealed its striking design of Holm Place, a new build nestled in the upper garden of Manor Court, a 17th-Century structure which is located within the South Warnborough Conservation Area of Hampshire in England. 

The two-story house is positioned adjacent to the massing of Manor Court so that the profile of its roof edge on the first and second floors align with the eaves and ridge of the property.

The two-story house is positioned adjacent to the massing of Manor Court so that the profile of its roof edge on the first and second floors align with the eaves and ridge of the property.

Courtesy of Martin Gardner

The 3,735-square-foot residence has been designed to harmoniously merge with the surrounding heritage buildings and complement its original site, which it does seamlessly thanks to the use of similar materials, forms, and proportions. The team of architects have also crafted the new dwelling to feature a modern L-shaped plan that extends to the edges of the site to embrace the best perspectives of Manor Court’s green gardens.



The design was a response to the homeowner’s request for a bright, modern, and sustainable, four-bedroom home. The clients wanted open-plan living areas, a direct relationship to the garden, and thresholds that blur the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.

The design was a response to the homeowner’s request for a bright, modern, and sustainable, four-bedroom home. The clients wanted open-plan living areas, a direct relationship to the garden, and thresholds that blur the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.

Courtesy of Martin Gardner

“From our first visit, we identified a strong relationship between the existing house and the brick boundary wall that bounded the site. This gave rise to the notion of a traditional English walled garden as a means to orientate the new house,” says architect James Chapman. 

The simple building materials —brick, timber, off-white render, glass, and zinc— and the elevation of the house take its cue from Manor Court.

The simple building materials —brick, timber, off-white render, glass, and zinc— and the elevation of the house take its cue from Manor Court. 

Courtesy of Martin Gardner

See the full story on Dwell.com: A 17th-Century Conservation Area in England Greets a Modern Home

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