Block out noise and distraction by soundproofing your home office.

The 1950s desk in the office is from the original house; the chair is by Aksel, a Norwegian furniture company. Sævik designed the pencil holder.

Today’s hyperconnected economy means that more of us work from home now than ever before. While not having a commute has its benefits, one of the biggest challenges for homebound workers is keeping noise—whether it be construction in the neighborhood or kids running down the hallways—out of the workspace.

Regain focus and boost your productivity—below, we walk you through seven steps to soundproofing your home office. 

1. Seal Holes in the Walls 

A large wall is a great sound blocker, but it’s useless if there are any holes in it. Inspect the walls and ceilings of your home office, and if you find any perforations, fill them in with sound-absorbing materials such as fiberglass batt insulation. 

Adjustable pegboards help lawyer Dan Franklin manage his compact apartment in downtown Manhattan. The Executive Chair is by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller.

2. Install a Solid Core Door 

Solid core doors are much better sound absorbers that hollow core doors. If you want to ensure that no sound enters through your door, install a solid core door, and add vinyl weatherstripping and a bottom sweep and threshold seal. 



 3. Caulk Spaces in Your Drywall 

Look out for cracks and crevices on your drywall around electrical boxes and ductwork, and caulk these openings to prevent noise from entering your work sanctuary.

A Mash Studio Wall-Mounted desk offers a place to study. The rug is from One King’s Lane and a SoCo Modern Socket pendant illuminates the room.

A Mash Studio Wall-Mounted desk offers a place to study. The rug is from One King’s Lane and a SoCo Modern Socket pendant illuminates the room.

Photo: Katrina Wittkamp

See the full story on Dwell.com: 7 Effective Ways to Soundproof Your Home Office

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