6 Simple Foraged Floral Displays For Midsummer’s Eve



Tomorrow it’s one of my favourite days in the Swedish calendar: Midsummer. As with all big Swedish events, they celebrate the day before on ‘midsommarafton’ (midsummer’s eve). Even if we’ve enjoyed sunshine for weeks on end, there’s an inside joke that the temperature will plummet and the grey clouds will roll in just as the final flower is pinned to the maypole. But boy is it a pretty affair. Forget lavish displays and complicated recipes, the event is a perfectly understated party with pretty flowers plucked from nearby meadows and everyone bringing something to the table. And this year it looks like the weather gods are actually on our side too! Up and down the country this time tomorrow, our Nordic friends will be making floral crowns, dancing around maypoles, and eating pickled herrings, potatoes and strawberries, washed down with Schnapps (along with a ditty or two!), in perfect sunshine! Hurrah! In case you’d like to pay tribute to this beautiful day in your own country, here’s a little floral inspiration to get you started! 
Forget lavish bouquets, midsummer is all about foraging for wild flowers and creating simple displays with the help of jam jars or simple glass vases. The picture below is from one of Frolic’s private foraged flowers workshops
You might recognise the table setting below from Frida Edlund’s beautiful Swedish country home which I featured a few weeks back (it’s also available for short term holiday lets – how wonderful is that?! The recipe for the potato-pea salad with honey-mustard dressing can be found here

I hope this has given you a few pretty ideas!

See also 5 ways to celebrate midsummer like a Swede and a short and pretty guide to celebrating midsummer, Swedish style.

Wishing you all a wonderful Midsummer! See you Monday!

Niki

Photos: 1&6 Our Food Stories / Frida Edlund 2 Annie Gozard 3 Frolic  4 The Meledeos 5 Magnolia Rouge

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Tomorrow it’s one of my favourite days in the Swedish calendar: Midsummer. As with all big Swedish events, they celebrate the day before on ‘midsommarafton’ (midsummer’s eve). Even if we’ve enjoyed sunshine for weeks on end, there’s an inside joke that the temperature will plummet and the grey clouds will roll in just as the final flower is pinned to the maypole. But boy is it a pretty affair. Forget lavish displays and complicated recipes, the event is a perfectly understated party with pretty flowers plucked from nearby meadows and everyone bringing something to the table. And this year it looks like the weather gods are actually on our side too! Up and down the country this time tomorrow, our Nordic friends will be making floral crowns, dancing around maypoles, and eating pickled herrings, potatoes and strawberries, washed down with Schnapps (along with a ditty or two!), in perfect sunshine! Hurrah! In case you’d like to pay tribute to this beautiful day in your own country, here’s a little floral inspiration to get you started! 
Forget lavish bouquets, midsummer is all about foraging for wild flowers and creating simple displays with the help of jam jars or simple glass vases. The picture below is from one of Frolic’s private foraged flowers workshops
You might recognise the table setting below from Frida Edlund’s beautiful Swedish country home which I featured a few weeks back (it’s also available for short term holiday lets – how wonderful is that?! The recipe for the potato-pea salad with honey-mustard dressing can be found here

I hope this has given you a few pretty ideas!

See also 5 ways to celebrate midsummer like a Swede and a short and pretty guide to celebrating midsummer, Swedish style.

Wishing you all a wonderful Midsummer! See you Monday!

Niki

Photos: 1&6 Our Food Stories / Frida Edlund 2 Annie Gozard 3 Frolic  4 The Meledeos 5 Magnolia Rouge