These homes across the world take advantage of the expressive nature of board-formed concrete.

At the family home Israeli architect Pitsou Kedem, modern and light-filled interiors enliven a brutalist, raw concrete structure in the city of Ramat HaSharon near Tel Aviv. Kedem took inspiration from the brutalist buildings commonly found in the neighborhood, which was established by army veterans in the 1950s. The house comprises two concrete squares—one stacked on top of the other—on a sloping 7,750-square-foot plot. The concrete on the exterior as well as the interior was designed so that it left the marks of the wood boards that formed the concrete mold, emphasizing the building's long and low form.

Sometimes called “old fashioned concrete” because of its old-school construction method, board-formed concrete remains very popular today. Clients, designers, and architects use this technique to  inject personality, depth, warmth, and texture into their projects. We’ve gathered together some of our favorite homes that utilize and celebrate this striking material below—take a look and be ready to feel inspired!

Aranzazu House in Buenos Aires, Argentina

At a home in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Besonías Almeida Arquitectos were asked by the client to design a home built with exposed concrete that also incorporated wood to "break the monochromatic expression." The resulting design not only incorporated the two materials together, but also inextricably linked them by using board-formed concrete that expresses the texture and grain of the wood boards from the mold, but in a horizontal orientation in contrast to the verticals of the wood panels.

At a home in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Besonías Almeida Arquitectos were asked by the client to design a home built with exposed concrete that also incorporated wood to “break the monochromatic expression.” The resulting design not only incorporated the two materials together, but also inextricably linked them by using board-formed concrete that expresses the texture and grain of the wood boards from the mold, but in a horizontal orientation in contrast to the verticals of the wood panels.

Photo: Federico Kulekdjian Fotografía



Inside Out Architecture renovated an apartment in the Clerkenwell section of central London, removing interior walls to create an open, loft-like living space. The architects were taken in by the "dramatic geometry" of the existing board-formed concrete ceiling, and their design maintained and emphasized its dynamic criss-crosses and texture.

Inside Out Architecture renovated an apartment in the Clerkenwell section of central London, removing interior walls to create an open, loft-like living space. The architects were taken in by the “dramatic geometry” of the existing board-formed concrete ceiling, and their design maintained and emphasized its dynamic criss-crosses and texture.

Photo by Jim Stephenson

At the family home Israeli architect Pitsou Kedem, modern and light-filled interiors enliven a brutalist, raw concrete structure in the city of Ramat HaSharon near Tel Aviv. Kedem took inspiration from the brutalist buildings commonly found in the neighborhood, which was established by army veterans in the 1950s. The house comprises two concrete squares—one stacked on top of the other—on a sloping 7,750-square-foot plot. The concrete on the exterior as well as the interior was designed so that it left the marks of the wood boards that formed the concrete mold, emphasizing the building's long and low form.

At the family home Israeli architect Pitsou Kedem, modern and light-filled interiors enliven a brutalist, raw concrete structure in the city of Ramat HaSharon near Tel Aviv. Kedem took inspiration from the brutalist buildings commonly found in the neighborhood, which was established by army veterans in the 1950s. The house comprises two concrete squares—one stacked on top of the other—on a sloping 7,750-square-foot plot. The concrete on the exterior as well as the interior was designed so that it left the marks of the wood boards that formed the concrete mold, emphasizing the building’s long and low form.

Photo: Amit Geron

See the full story on Dwell.com: 23 Beautifully Textured Board-Formed Concrete Homes

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