You won’t believe what they’re doing now.

Will Gamble Architects revived a crumbling, 17th-century structure with a svelte addition of steel, brick, and glass. The disorderly nature of the ruin is juxtaposed against the modern structure, which expands a Victorian-era residence. The facade’s brickwork was largely completed using reclaimed materials, allowing the new section to sensitively blend into its surroundings.

Like diamonds in the rough, these dilapidated churches, factories, and warehouses sat abandoned for years. But then a bit of imagination (and a whole lot of work) transformed these offbeat typologies into shining homes with character to spare. Read on for 16 of our favorite adaptive reuse projects that polish up unlikely spaces.

A 17th-Century Parchment Factory in England

Will Gamble Architects revived a crumbling, 17th-century structure with a svelte addition of steel, brick, and glass. The disorderly nature of the ruin is juxtaposed against the modern structure, which expands a Victorian-era residence. The facade’s brickwork was largely completed using reclaimed materials, allowing the new section to sensitively blend into its surroundings.

Will Gamble Architects revived a crumbling, 17th-century structure with a svelte addition of steel, brick, and glass. The disorderly nature of the ruin is juxtaposed against the modern structure, which expands a Victorian-era residence. The facade’s brickwork was largely completed using reclaimed materials, allowing the new section to sensitively blend into its surroundings.

Photo by John Dehlin

New York City–based architecture and interior design firm Fogarty Finger transformed this propeller factory into a stylish, modern home that gives a firm nod to its industrial past. The firm preserved the building’s historic facade and the original company sign.

New York City–based architecture and interior design firm Fogarty Finger transformed this propeller factory into a stylish, modern home that gives a firm nod to its industrial past. The firm preserved the building’s historic facade and the original company sign.

Courtesy of Alexander Severin

In the mid-1970s, architect Ricardo Bofill transformed the abandoned Sansón Cement Factory, which is five miles outside Barcelona in the village of Sant Just Desvern, into his home and the headquarters for his firm. The former cement factory’s grounds were brought to life with Mediterranean plantings.

In the mid-1970s, architect Ricardo Bofill transformed the abandoned Sansón Cement Factory, which is five miles outside Barcelona in the village of Sant Just Desvern, into his home and the headquarters for his firm. The former cement factory’s grounds were brought to life with Mediterranean plantings.

Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

See the full story on Dwell.com: 16 Amazing Adaptive Reuse Projects That Will Make You Look Twice
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